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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
as the largest city in the u.s. to ever file for bankruptcy. and a deadly shooting at oikos university in oakland left seven people dead and a community in shock. and obama care was given the seal of approval by the u.s. supreme court, now poised to take on prop 8 and the defense of marriage act. california's high-speed rail stayed on track but just barely. the controversial bullet train came under fire from many sides with funding still in question. the state parks were saved from closing but suffered another setback when an unused surplus of millions of dollars was discovered sitting in a secret account. and there was also excitement. the golden gate bridge celebrated its 75th anniversary, and a new bay bridge neared completion. the mars curiosity captured our attention and imagination, turning thoughts to the possibility of life on other planets. and with their backs against the wall, the san francisco giants refused to die, bringing home their second world series championship in three years. and of course, belva davis retired after hosting this show for nearly two decades. >> well, that gives
, and moore, professor of law. the u.s. supreme court convened today behind closed doors discussing whether or not to review a lower court ruling striking down california's proposition 8. their highly anticipated decision could come monday. as you well know, the supreme court gets seven to eight thousand requests for cases to be reviewed. how do they decide? they only pick 80 or so a year. what is the criteria and why would prop 8 be an important one to look at? >> it's how legal the precedent is and how national the question is, how many people it affects, and relatedly, how much lower courts are struggling over that and related questions. so in the prop 8 case, it's true the prop 8 is a california-specific measure, and it's also true that a ninth circuit ruling tried to make its ruling non-specific. california is such an important state and it occurs in dozens of other states and that's why it might have some appeal for the supreme court. >> as you said, the ninth circuit narrowed it down, but when the court gets it, could they broaden it back up and make it a national ruling? >> indeed,
in northern california." big news today from the u.s. supreme court on gay marriage. before we get to our other topics, we'll briefly discuss that with our panelists. joining me tonight are jill tucker, "san francisco chronicle" education reporter. matthai kuruvila, also with the "san francisco chronicle." and paul rogers with "san jose mercury news." the high court announced it will review proposition 8, california's ban on same-sex marriage and the federal defense of marriage act. paul, we'll begin with you. what can we infer from this? what's the time frame? can we expect any sweeping judgments? >> well, a timeframe is the arguments are going to happen in march then we expect a decision by the end of the court session which is june 27th. it will probably go right to the very end. as for how sweeping and how big of a decision we can expect, that's sort of the $64,000 question that court watchers were already speculating about today. are we going to get a narrow ruling one way or another on either one of these two cases or is it going to be one of those once in a generation social civil
's a lottery for green cards in the u.s. it takes those 55,000 visas and says we're going to get rid of lottery and make those visas available for people who have advanced degrees in science, technology, engineering, math. and it's the only bill that the republicans have been willing to pass out of the house. and what the democrats, interestingly enough, the democrats and the president have really stood firm on this. they support the underlying legislation. they don't want to get rid of the diversity lottery. they think we can do both. but they think it needs to be part of a bigger package. >> okay. >> what's being called comprehensive immigration reform. that's really not just about these taxes, that's about legalizing the 11 million undocumented immigrants in this country, giving them a pass to earn citizenship. that's about fixing broken laws that make it really hard even for legal immigrants. and it's about fixing the future flow, because really we haven't set up a system so that people can immigrate here lawfully which is why we have so many undocumented immigrants. >> let me ask you about
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)